ONLY THE LIVING LEARN, SO LET THE LIVING LEARN ENGLISH LANGUAGE

1. STEER CLEAR or STIR CLEAR...?

It's common to read or hear folks write or say STIR CLEAR.

However, the right expression is:

STEER CLEAR of somebody or something means:

to avoid someone or something that seems unpleasant, dangerous, or likely to cause problems: ✔

Examples

** Her speech steered clear of controversial issues.

** They warned their children to steer clear of drugs.

STIR CLEAR is not an English language expression ❌

Though, STIR as well as CLEAR is an English word but both don't go together unlike STEER CLEAR.

2. COME WHAT MAY or COME WHAT ME?

It is also common to hear folks say COME WHAT ME when they should actually have said:

COME WHAT MAY ✔

COME WHAT ME ❌

COME WHAT MAY means
whatever happens:

Examples

** I shall be there tonight come what may.

** It's always good to know that, come what may, your job is safe.

3. HALF A LOAF IS BETTER THAN NO BREAD or HALF BREAD IS BETTER THAN NONE

The correct English language idiom is HALF A LOAF IS BETTER THAN NO BREAD: ✔✔

MEANING it is better to accept less than one wants or expects than to have nothing at all. ✔

The other expression HALF BREAD IS BETTER THAN NONE ❌❌ is a NIGERIANISED expression

4 SOMETHING IS FISHY or SOMETHING IS FISHING ?

The above also creates confusion among Nigerian users of the language.

When something is FISHY ✔ we idiomatically mean that something is arousing feelings of doubt or suspicion in us.

SOMETHING IS FISHING is not acceptable as an idiom in the same vein as the idiom so described above. ❌❌

5. A HALF DAY or HALF A DAY...?

The idiom "A HALF DAY" is a day when you work only in the morning or in the afternoon, but not all day. ✔✔

It should not be expressed as HALF A DAY as one often hears folks say... ❌❌

Folks, this is where we drop the curtain for today's class.

I appreciate everyone who sent me 'get-well-soon' message on Facebook, Messenger, SMS or put calls through while my travails lasted in the hands of WHITLOW.

Thank you all.

References:

Online Cambridge Dictionary

WALE ADENAYA, JUNE 17TH, '18